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Biochemist

ChinaBiochemistChemist

Daisy Yen Wu

Daisy Yen Wu was a pioneering Chinese woman in the fields of biochemistry and nutrition. Born into a wealthy family in Shanghai in 1902, she pursued her education in the United States and became the first Chinese woman to work as an academic researcher in these fields. Wu’s dedication to education and research led her to establish scholarships and make significant contributions to the scientific community. She passed away in 1993, leaving a lasting legacy on these fields.

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United StatesAfrican AmericanBiochemist

Alice Ball

Alice Augusta Ball was an American chemist who developed the “Ball Method,” the most effective treatment for leprosy at that time. Despite her remarkable achievements, her contributions to science were not recognized until many years after her untimely death at the age of 24. Her groundbreaking research and the “Ball Method” gained widespread recognition in the 1970s, establishing her as a true icon in the history of scientific breakthroughs and women’s empowerment.

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Czech RepublicUnited StatesArcher

Gerty Cori

Gerty Theresa Cori was a Czech-American biochemist who defied societal expectations to make significant contributions to the field of science. With her husband, Carl Ferdinand Cori, she discovered the mechanism behind glycogen metabolism and the Cori cycle, earning them the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1947. Despite facing barriers as a woman in science, Gerty’s passion and determination paved the way for advancements in the treatment of metabolic disorders.

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FranceArcherBiochemist

Emmanuelle Charpentier

Emmanuelle Marie Charpentier was born on December 11, 1968, in Juvisy-sur-Orge, France. She is a renowned French professor and researcher in microbiology, genetics, and biochemistry. Charpentier’s groundbreaking work in the field of genome editing has propelled her to the forefront of scientific research and earned her numerous accolades.

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Great BritainBiochemistChemist

Marjory Stephenson

Marjory Stephenson was a British biochemist who made significant contributions to microbiology and enzymology. Her groundbreaking research on bacterial metabolism and her role in establishing the Society for General Microbiology earned her numerous awards and recognition. Despite facing financial constraints and societal barriers against women in science, Stephenson’s perseverance and immense talent allowed her to leave a lasting legacy in the scientific community as a true trailblazer in the field of microbiology.

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United KingdomBiochemistChemist

Kathleen Culhane Lathbury

Kathleen Culhane Lathbury was a British biochemist known for her groundbreaking work with insulin and vitamins. Throughout her career, Lathbury made significant contributions to the field of chemistry, particularly in the field of pharmaceuticals. Her dedication to her work, perseverance in the face of adversity, and pioneering research have left a lasting impact on the scientific community.

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CanadaArcherBiochemist

Clara Benson

Clara Cynthia Benson (1875–1964) was a Canadian chemist and an influential figure in the field of biochemistry. She is best known as the sole female founder of the American Society for Biological Chemistry, now known as the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB). Benson’s groundbreaking contributions to the scientific community and her pioneering role as one of the first two women to earn a Ph.D. from the University of Toronto (U of T) have left a lasting impact on the field of biochemistry and women’s history.

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United StatesBiochemistChemist

Icie Hoobler

Icie Gertrude Macy Hoobler was an American biochemist dedicated to researching human nutrition, with a focus on the well-being of mothers and children. Despite facing discrimination, she became the first woman to chair a local section of the American Chemical Society and received 22 prestigious awards for her groundbreaking research. Her passion for science and concern for children’s wellness stemmed from her upbringing on a farm in Missouri and a formative experience with sick children in Arkansas. Hoobler’s resilience and advocacy continue to inspire generations of scientists.

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United StatesBiochemistChemist

Gertrude B. Elion

Gertrude “Trudy” Belle Elion (January 23, 1918 – February 21, 1999) made significant contributions to medicine through her innovative methods of rational drug design. She revolutionized the field by focusing on understanding drug targets, leading to the development of life-saving medications such as AZT for AIDS and acyclovir for herpes. Despite facing gender discrimination, she persevered and became an icon in women’s history.

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United StatesBiochemistChemist

Mildred Cohn

Mildred Cohn (1913-2009) was an American biochemist who made significant contributions to the field of biochemistry. Her pioneering work in using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to study enzyme reactions greatly advanced our understanding of biochemical processes, particularly in relation to adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Despite facing gender discrimination, Cohn persisted in her studies and achieved remarkable success in her career. Her research and innovative techniques have inspired countless aspiring scientists, especially women, who have followed in her footsteps.

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United KingdomBiochemistChemist

Dorothy Maud Wrinch

Dorothy Maud Wrinch (1894-1976) was a prominent mathematician and biochemical theorist known for her groundbreaking work in deducing protein structure using mathematical principles. Born in Rosario, Argentina, she later moved to England and pursued her education in mathematics at Girton College, Cambridge. She played a significant role in supporting and promoting the work of Bertrand Russell and Ludwig Wittgenstein. Her contributions to the fields of mathematics and biochemistry continue to inspire scientists worldwide.

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United StatesAfrican AmericanBiochemist

Ida Stephens Owens

Ida Stephens Owens, a trailblazing American scientist, overcame adversity to become one of the first African Americans to receive a doctorate from Duke University. Her groundbreaking research on drug-detoxifying enzymes at the National Institutes of Health has left an indelible mark on the field of biomedical research. Owens’ unwavering commitment and contributions continue to inspire future generations.

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United StatesBiochemistEngineer

Frances Arnold

Frances Hamilton Arnold, an American chemical engineer and Nobel Laureate, has made significant contributions to the field of bioengineering. She currently holds the prestigious position of Linus Pauling Professor at the California Institute of Technology. In 2018, Arnold was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for her pioneering work in the use of directed evolution to engineer enzymes. Her groundbreaking research and commitment to advancing the field of bioengineering have solidified her position as one of the most respected and influential scientists of her time.

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MexicoBiochemistDiver

Natalie Gibb

Natalie Gibb, a prominent figure in cave exploration and underwater photography, has made significant contributions to the field of diving. Born in Orange County, California in 1980, Gibb developed a passion for adventure and exploration from an early age. Her upbringing in the natural beauty of her surroundings played a pivotal role in shaping her career.

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United StatesAfrican AmericanBiochemist

Marie Maynard Daly

Marie Maynard Daly was an American biochemist who made significant contributions to the field of chemistry and medicine. She was the first African-American woman in the United States to earn a Ph.D. in chemistry and the first African-American to receive a Ph.D. from Columbia University. Her groundbreaking research on protein synthesis, hypertension, and muscle cells’ uptake of creatine deepened our understanding of biochemistry and paved the way for medical advancements. Daly’s commitment to diversity and inclusivity also played a vital role in inspiring underrepresented individuals to pursue careers in science.

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United StatesAstronautBiochemist

Shannon Lucid

Shannon Wells Lucid, the accomplished American biochemist and former NASA astronaut, has made significant contributions to space exploration. Born on January 14, 1943 in Shanghai, Republic of China, Lucid holds the distinction of being the only American woman to have stayed on the Russian space station Mir, leaving an indelible mark on women’s history.

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United StatesAstronautBiochemist

Peggy Whitson

Peggy Annette Whitson, an American biochemistry researcher and former NASA astronaut, has made significant contributions to space exploration. From her childhood dream of becoming an astronaut to commanding the International Space Station and setting multiple records, Whitson has left an indelible mark on the field. Her legacy as a trailblazer and role model continues as she mentors the next generation of astronauts. Recognized as one of Time magazine’s 100 Most Influential People of 2018, Whitson’s impact on society and women’s history is remarkable.

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United StatesAfrican AmericanArcher

Audrey S. Penn

Audrey Shields Penn, born in 1934, is an American neurologist and emeritus professor known for her groundbreaking research in the biochemistry of muscle weakness in myasthenia gravis. Penn’s contributions to the field of neurology have had a profound impact on our understanding of neurological disorders and have paved the way for advancements in treatment options. Moreover, her accomplishments as an African-American woman in a male-dominated field have made her an inspirational figure and a trailblazer for future generations.

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